Best books of 2017 science

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best books of 2017 science

22 of the best science books from - BBC Science Focus Magazine

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BEST BOOKS OF 2017!

The book options included a novella about an out-of-this-world college student, a tale about life in the sunken New York City of the future, and astronaut Scott Kelly's memoir about his year in space. There was a little something for everyone who loves the Earth, the stars, or those who inhabit them. Our favorite science-y reads from won't all be found in the science section at your local bookstore.

Science books we're keen to read in 2017

At its heart, science is about curiosity. So it stands to reason that a book about science should make you examine your world more closely, and in doing so, give you a sense of childhood wonder and whimsy. But the best science and tech writing goes one step further. In doing so, they make our experience of that world that much richer. In , the average American ate 92 pounds of chicken.

"The Martian" author Andy Weir returned with a second tale about life in space.

T hink of anything that ever breathed — from bacteria to blue whales to Roman emperors — and some of his, her or its last breath is either circulating inside you now or will be shortly. - This book should crown his efforts to understand how humans use science to grapple with the edges of the knowable world.

Check out their picks below. The River of Consciousness , by Oliver Sacks. In his signature Sacksian way, he gets at the universal through the deeply personal—not only with case studies of his patients, as he has done so beautifully for nearly half a century across his books, but this time with the case study of his own self as his body goes through the process of aging and eventually dying. Sacks brings the friendly curiosity for which he is so beloved to this ultimate testing ground of character, emerging once more as the brilliant, lovable human he was. Read more on Brain Pickings.

I have written at length about what separates great science books from the merely good , but I keep coming back to the elegant criterion Carson both named and exemplified. In his signature Sacksian way, he explores the universal through the deeply personal — not only with case studies of his patients, as he has done so beautifully for nearly half a century across his classic books, but this time with the case study of his own self as his body and mind go through the process of aging and eventually dying. Sacks brings the friendly curiosity for which he is so beloved to this ultimate testing ground of character, emerging once more as the brilliant, lovable human he was. Read more here. For biologist David George Haskell , the notion of listening to trees is neither metaphysical abstraction nor mere metaphor. While Alan Turing was decrypting Nazi communication across the Atlantic, some eleven thousand women were breaking enemy code in America. In Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation public library , New Yorker staff writer Alan Burdick presents a layered, rigorously researched, lyrically narrated inquiry into the most befuddling dimension of existence.

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