Music the brain and ecstasy pdf

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music the brain and ecstasy pdf

^READ^ Music the Brain and Ecstasy How Music Captures Our Imaginati…

What makes a distant oboe's wail beautiful? Why do some kinds of music lift us to ecstasy, but not others? How can music make sense to an ear and brain evolved for detecting the approaching lion or tracking the unsuspecting gazelle? Lyrically interweaving discoveries from science, psychology, music theory, paleontology, and philosophy, Robert Jourdian brilliantly examines. Lyrically interweaving discoveries from science, psychology, music theory, paleontology, and philosophy, Robert Jourdian brilliantly examines why music speaks to us in ways that words cannot, and why we form such powerful connections to it. Along the way, a fascinating cast of characters brings Jourdian's narrative to vivid life: "idiots savants" who absorb whole pieces on a single hearing, composers who hallucinate entire compositions, a psychic who claims to take dictation from long-dead composers, and victims of brain damage who can move only when they hear music.
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Music on the Brain: Jessica Grahn at TEDxWaterloo 2013

how music captures our imagination. by Jourdain, Robert. In library, Philosophy and aesthetics, Physiological aspects of Music, Psychological aspects of Music, Christianity, Music therapy, Music, Psychological aspects, Physiological aspects.

Music, the Brain, and Ecstasy: How Music Captures Our Imagination

Many of us know from our own experience that music can evoke ecstasy. But it takes a rather remarkable sum of talents to account for how vibrations in the air actually do this, without leaving the lay reader behind in a cloud of phenomenological, musicological and neurophysiological dust. Jourdain, who is based in Northern California, does independent research on artificial intelligence and is a musician. He is also a splendid, imaginative writer whose prose, lucid and beautifully succinct, has all the liveliness of a Mozart allegro. In reading it, I found myself in the presence of a kindred spirit and, while delightedly reconsidering things I have often mused upon--such as the connection of music to the emotional and spiritual realm--I also found I was learning quite a lot about processes I never even knew were occurring.

But perhaps even more fascinating than the subject of how music works is the question of why it makes us feel the way it does. Today, we try to answer it with seven essential books that bridge music, emotion and cognition, peeling away at that tender intersection of where your brain ends and your soul begins. But some of his most compelling work has to do with the neuropscyhology of how music can transform our cognition, our behavior, and our very selves. In Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, Revised and Expanded Edition , Sacks explores the most extreme of these transformations and how simple harmonies can profoundly change lives. Why music makes us feel the way it does is on par with questions about the nature of divinity or the origin of love.

Music, the brain, and ecstasy

It looks like this book is on our website merchantnavymemorialtrust. What makes a distant oboe's wail beautiful?

Skip to search form Skip to main content. Jourdain Published What makes a distant oboe's wail beautiful? Why do some kinds of music lift us to ecstasy, but not others? How can music make sense to an ear and brain evolved for detecting the approaching lion or tracking the unsuspecting gazelle? Lyrically interweaving discoveries from science, psychology, music theory, paleontology, and philosophy, Robert Jourdian brilliantly examines why music speaks to us in ways that words cannot, and why we form such powerful connections to it. View PDF.

The nerves departing the cochlear split 3 ways, 2 related to localization and the other freq components clear ordered division between lo and hi freqs. From sound Human brains have far more sophisticated sound processing capabilities than other animals The faintest sound that we can detect translates to the eardrum moving the width of a hydrogen atom The pinnae amplify high freq by reflection and slightly amplify a range of other mid freqs by resonance. The ear canal resonance. The olivary bodies compare signals from the two ears. The inferior colliculi do spacial mapping.

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3 thoughts on “Music, the brain, and ecstasy ( edition) | Open Library

  1. In an ethnographic investigation of drug use among second-generation Southeast Asian youth in Northern California , respondents described little use of or interest in using Ecstasy; yet in a second study, Ecstasy was the fourth most commonly-used substance.

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